Members:
Text Size: A A A

Category Archives: News

CWT announce Awards short-list

The Caroline Walker Trust (CWT) has great pleasure in announcing the shortlist for the 30th Anniversary CWT Awards to be held in London on 12 November 2019.

There were many fantastic entries this year, and our judges had their work cut out for them. We are delighted with the outcome of their recommendations following their intense scrutiny and insightful deliberations.

The CWT believes that this year’s awards showcase the passion, courage and conviction of those who work to improve the quality of our food and nation’s health, and for those who live in poverty. We were delighted to see such a range of innovative nominees, many of whom dare to challenge the status quo, each of which demonstrate their excellence by being distinctive and outstanding in their work.

Below are the entries which are now taking one step closer to gaining the title ‘Of the Year’ award.  Congratulations to everyone who entered and all those who have been short-listed.

We look forward to announcing the winners of each category in London on 12th November 2019. The CWT hope you will join us in recognising their efforts and contribution to improving the nation’s health. Please go to the event page for more information on joining us for the award evening.

Charity Food Campaigner of the Year

City Harvest
HENRY
IGD
One Feeds Two
SUSTAIN

Food Hero of the Year

The Fruit and Veg Kids
Jason O’Rourke
Nutrition Scotland
StreetCube
Lyndsey Withers

Media Food Campaigner of the Year

Sabine Goodwin
Rhiannon Lambert
Early Start Nutrition
Pixie Turner
AfN Twitter

Nutritionist of the Year

Barbara Bray
Glenys Jones
Kawther Hashem
Greg Lessons
Louis Levy

Freelance Nutritionist of the Year

Claire Baseley
Barbara Bray
Shaleen Meelu
Charlotte Stirling-Reed
Laura Wyness

Allergies and allergen management meeting

SENSE will be holding the biannual meeting in London on 4 October 2019. The topic for discussion is Allergies and Allergen Management. The meeting is for Nutritionists and Dietitians who have an interest in Allergies and Allergens.

Lineup includes;
Ms Judy Moore, RD, R.Nutr., speaking on Allergies – an overview for adult and children. Judy will discuss the main allergic responses and provide case studies.
Ms Julie Mann, Head of Food Safety at Boparan. Julie will discuss Foodservice: How to manage the complexities and communicate with consumers.
Miss Alexi Poole, Head of Operations at Spoon Guru. Alexi will discuss technological solutions: What tools are available to help consumers.
Mis Michelle Victor Partner Leigh Day Solicitors. Michelle will discuss the legal perspective and in particular Natasha’s Law.

A panel discussion will follow on what can be done collaboratively.

Click here for the full programme.
SENSE members: free
Non SENSE members: £50

Register for this meeting, please contact Chris Hawkins [email protected]

AfN CPD has been applied for.

CWT response to the Department of Health Childhood Obesity Consultation

Our Trust is very aware that childhood obesity has become one of the most serious public health issues of our time. Overweight and obese children are most likely to remain obese into adulthood and develop non-communicable diseases. (1) It has been well established that obesity is multifactorial and a result of biological, behavioural and environmental factors that are well beyond the control of a single individual.

Food advertising, television and the internet, have been identified as factors contributing to the excess consumption of energy dense and nutrient poor foods high in fat, salt and sugar (HFSS) in children. (2, 3, 4) A number of systematic reviews have found food advertising to influence children’s food preferences, purchase requests and consumption. Research suggests that children are unable to understand the persuasive intent of marketing and so remain a vulnerable group to its effects. (5)

It is clear from the evidence base that short-term exposure to food advertising increases energy consumption, specifically that of unhealthy foods and that there is a need for policymakers to address this public health issue. (6) Therefore, we welcome the Government’s consultation on further restricting advertising for products high in fat, salt and sugar. This is a positive step towards the Government’s ambition of halving childhood obesity by 2030.

As trustees of The Caroline Walker Trust, we fully support the introduction of a 9 pm watershed on HFSS adverts across all media. It reflects changing viewing habits with further Ofcom research finding children are increasingly watching videos, TV programmes and films on their own devices, often on- demand, rather than on a dedicated TV channel with parental supervision.

Television

We support Option 1: introduce a 9 pm – 5:30 am watershed on broadcast TV. Research shows that junk food advertising influences children’s food preferences (7), and how much they eat (8), with one study finding that children who can recall seeing unhealthy food and drink adverts on television daily are more than twice as likely to be obese. This leads to children pestering parents to purchase unhealthy products. (9) Restricting the advertising of products high in fat, salt and sugar during the times further when children are most likely to watch television, would help reduce their intake of products high in fat, salt and sugar (10,11,12).

Nutrient profiling has been recognised by WHO as a useful tool for a variety of applications and is considered to be a critical tool for the implementation of restrictions on the marketing of foods to children.

We support the use of the Nutrient Profile Model to identify food and drinks which should be subject to the restrictions. This is an evidence-based tool which is already used to restrict advertising.

Online

We support Option 1: introduce a 9pm-5.30 am watershed online. Evidence shows that children who used the Internet for over 3 hours per day are almost 4 times more likely to buy junk food products than children who used the Internet for little or no time. (13)  It also makes children almost 3 times more likely to pester their parents for junk food. Restricting the advertising of products high in fat, salt and sugar online would help reduce children’s intake of products high in fat, salt and sugar. (14)

We support the use of the Nutrient Profile Model to identify food and drinks which should be subject to the restrictions. This is an evidence-based tool which is already used to restrict advertising.

—the end—

1 Sahoo, K., Sahoo, B., Choudhury, A. K., Sofi, N. Y., Kumar, R., & Bhadoria, A. S. (2015). Childhood obesity: causes and consequences. Journal of family medicine and primary care, 4(2), 187–19.

2 Adams, J., Tyrrell, R., Adamson, A. J., & White, M. (2012). Effect of restrictions on television food advertising to children on exposure to advertisements for ‘less healthy’ foods: repeat cross-sectional study. PloS one, 7(2), e31578.

3 Kelly, B., Halford, J. C., Boyland, E. J., Chapman, K., Bautista-Castaño, I., Berg, C., … Summerbell, C. (2010). Television food advertising to children: a global perspective. American journal of public health, 100(9), 1730– 1736.

4 Boyland, EJ, Whalen, R. (2015). Food advertising to children and its effects on diet: review of recent prevalence and impact data. Pediatr Diabetes, 16( 5), 331‐ 337.

5 Boyland E, Nolan S, Kelly B (2016). Advertising as a cue to consume: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of acute exposure to unhealthy food and non-alcoholic beverage advertising on intake in children and adults. Am J Clin Nutr, 103 (2), 519-533.

6 Russell, S., Croker, H., & Viner, R. (2018). The effect of screen advertising on children’s dietary intake: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Obesity Reviews, 20(4), 554-568.

7 Boyland E, Nolan S, Kelly B (2016). Advertising as a cue to consume: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of acute exposure to unhealthy food and non-alcoholic beverage advertising on intake in children and adults. Am J Clin Nutr, 103 (2), 519-533.

8 Public Health England (October 2015). Sugar Reduction: the evidence for action.

92018. Cancer Research UK. A Prime Time for Action: new evidence on the link between television and on-demand marketing and obesity.

10 http://obesityhealthalliance.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/OHA-9pm-watershed-position-Feb-2019.pdf

11 Hastings, G. (2006). The extent, nature and effects of food promotion to children: a review of the evidence. WHO 16.

12 McDermott L et al. (2006). International food advertising, pester power and its effects. International Journal of Advertising.

13https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/sites/default/files/jfm_briefing_jan_19.pdf

14https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/sites/default/files/jfm_briefing_jan_19.pdf

Bittersweet Brexit by the Food Thinkers

The Centre for Food Policy announce their first Food Thinkers of 2019 with Dr Charlie Clutterbuck, discussing Bittersweet Brexit – where are we heading with our food and farming? Chaired by Professor Tim Lang.

The seminar will take place on Wednesday 23 January at 5.30pm, here at City, University of London.

With Brexit events moving so quickly, this talk will be a moving feast. The context is that UK food and farming could change more now and more quickly than in the last 70 years. Brexit is a moment of food system restructuring.

Dr Charlie Clutterbuck’s talk will focus on the role of human labour in farm and food provision, asking: (1) Why did it barely feature in UK politics of food when it is so central to how the food system actually works? (2) What does this say about UK food policy debate? (3) Was the silence about food labour part of what delivered the 2016 Brexit referendum vote? (4) What are the food labour issues which now need to be addressed, whatever happens in Brexit politics? (5) How can we make labour more central to

Latest Twitter Feeds

CWTFood @CWTFood
RT @dan_crossley:Looking forward to learning a lot tonight at our @FoodEthicsNews Business Forum exploring food, ethics and artificial intelligence!
RT @dan_crossley:Get your ticket now and come along to @impacthubkc on 26th Nov (6.30pm).... https://t.co/eihfoadYQ0
RT @providedevon:Food, shelter and dignity shouldn’t be viewed as luxuries. We are failing as a society by normalising the need for… https://t.co/q3a7pKx8eM
Load More...